15 Difference Between Lyophobic And Lyophilic Sol (With Examples)

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Sols can be defined as colloidal systems with solid as dispersed phase and liquid as dispersion medium. Lyophobic sol and Lyophilic sol are the only types of sols.

Lyophilic sols commonly described as liquid loving sols have a greater affinity for solvent. These sols are prepared easily by shaking or warming the dispersion phase in the dispersion medium. Lyophilic sols are also known as reversible colloids. On evaporating dispersion medium, the residue can again be reconverted into the colloidal state by the addition of the liquid.

 Lyophilic sols are relatively stable as strong forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium). The process preparation of lyophilic is quite simple since it only involves directly mixing colloid with liquid and things like stabilizers are not necessarily required during their preparation.

Lyophobic sols commonly described as liquid hating sols. These sols are less stable as weak forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium). Lyophobic sols are also known as irreversible medium because on evaporating the dispersion medium cannot be readily reconverted into sols by simple methods.

The process of preparation of lyophobic sols is relatively complex because their preparation is not like that of lyophilic sols whereby a liquid and colloid is mixed directly. Special methods such as mechanical agitation are employed to prepare lyophobic sols and additional stabilizers are required during their preparation.

Lyophobic Sol Characteristics

  1. Lyophobic sols or colloids also referred to as irreversible sols can be described as solvent loving colloids.
  2. The process of preparation of lyophobic sols is relatively complex because their preparation is not like that of lyophilic sols whereby a liquid and colloid is mixed directly. Special methods such as mechanical agitation are employed to prepare lyophobic sols and additional stabilizers are required during their preparation.
  3. Lyophobic sols are less stable as weak forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium).
  4. The physical properties of a lyophobic sol follow “law of mixture”.
  5. The viscosity of the lyophobic sols is slightly different from that of the dispersed medium.
  6. Depending on the nature of the charge, lyophobic molecules may migrate to either cathode or anode.
  7. The surface tension of lyophobic sols is nearly same as that of dispersed medium.
  8. Lyophobic sols are easily precipitated or coagulated on addition of some suitable electrolyte. They are not very stable and hence can be easily broken down.
  9. Lyophobic sols are not easily hydrated.  When water is taken as the solvent, lyophobic sols are referred to as hydrophobic colloids.
  10. The particles of lyophobic sols are not easily visible; however they are visible through a under ultramicroscope.
  11. All particles in a lyophobic sol have the same charge.
  12. Lyophobic sols can be described irreversible sols because on evaporating the liquid, the residue left cannot be converted into solution on addition of liquid alone.
  13. Particles in a lyophobic sol absorb ions from the medium.
  14. Lyophobic sols have strong Tyndall effects.
  15. Examples of lyophobic sol include: Ferric hydroxide or Aluminum hydroxide dissolved in water, platinum and iron hydroxide.

Also Read: Difference Between Colloid And Suspension

Lyophilic Sol Characteristics

  1. Lyophilic colloids also referred to as reversible colloids can be described as solvent hating colloids.
  2. The process of preparation of lyophilic is quite simple since it only involves directly mixing colloid with liquid and things like stabilizers are not necessarily required during their preparation.
  3. Lyophilic sols are relatively stable as strong forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium).
  4. The physical properties of a lyophilic sol do not follow the “law of mixture”.
  5. The lyophilic sols are highly viscous in nature and have higher viscosity than that of the dispersed medium.
  6. Depending upon the charge, lyophilic molecules may migrate to the cathode, anode or not move at all.
  7. The surface tension of these sols is less than that of dispersed medium.
  8. Lyophilic sols are not easily precipitated or coagulated as they are very stable in their state.
  9. Lyophilic sols are hydrated and have very high levels of water. When water is taken as the solvent, lyophilic sols are referred to as hydrophilic colloids.
  10. The particles of lyophilic sols are easily dissolved and not visible. They are not detectable under an ultramicroscope.
  11. The charge of the colloidal particles in lyophilic sol depends on the PH of the medium.
  12. Lyophilic sols can also be described as reversible sols because on evaporating the liquid, the residue left will pass into colloidal state on addition of liquid.
  13. Particles in the lyophilic sol absorb H+ and OH+ from the medium.
  14. Lyophilic sols have weak Tyndall effects.
  15. Examples of lyophilic sol include Starch or protein dissolved in water, gelatin, rubber and gum.

Also Read: Difference Between Sol And Gel With Examples

Difference Between Lyophobic And Lyophilic Sols In Tabular Form

BASIS OF COMPARISON     LYOPHOBIC SOL LYOPHILIC SOL
Description   Lyophobic  sols or colloids also referred to as irreversible sols can be described as solvent loving colloids.   Lyophilic colloids also referred to as reversible colloids can be described as solvent hating colloids.
Preparation Method Special methods such as mechanical agitation are employed to prepare lyophobic sols and additional stabilizers are required during their preparation.   The process of preparation is quite simple since it only involves directly mixing colloid with liquid and things like stabilizers are not necessarily required during their preparation.  
Stability They are less stable as weak forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium).     They are less stable as weak forces of interaction exist between colloidal particles and liquid (dispersed phase and dispersed medium).  
Physical Properties & ‘Law Of Mixtures’ The physical properties of a lyophobic sol follow “law of mixture”.   The physical properties of a lyophilic sol do not follow the “law of mixture”.  
Viscosity The viscosity of the lyophobic sols is slightly different from that of the dispersed medium.   They are highly viscous in nature and have higher viscosity than that of the dispersed medium.  
Migration Of Molecules To The Cathode & Anode Depending on the nature of the charge, lyophobic molecules may migrate to either cathode or anode.   Depending upon the charge, lyophilic molecules may migrate to the cathode, anode or not move at all.  
Surface Tension The surface tension of lyophobic sols is nearly same as that of dispersed medium.   The surface tension of these sols is less than that of dispersed medium.  
Precipitation/ Coagulation They are easily precipitated or coagulated on addition of some suitable electrolyte. Lyophobic sols are not very stable and hence can be easily broken down.   They are not easily precipitated or coagulated as they are very stable in their state.  
Level Of Hydration Lyophobic sols are not easily hydrated.  When water is taken as the solvent, lyophobic sols are referred to as hydrophobic colloids. They are hydrated and have very high levels of water. When water is taken as the solvent, lyophilic sols are referred to as hydrophilic colloids.    
Visibility Of Dissolved Particles The particles of these sols are not easily visible; however they are visible through a under ultramicroscope.   The particles of these sols are easily dissolved and not visible. They are not detectable under an ultramicroscope.  
Charge Of Particles All particles in a lyophobic sol have the same charge.   The charge of the colloidal particles in lyophilic sol depends on the PH of the medium.  
Alternative Description They can be described irreversible sols because on evaporating the liquid, the residue left cannot be converted into solution on addition of liquid alone.   They can also be described as reversible sols because on evaporating the liquid, the residue left will pass into colloidal state on addition of liquid.  
Absorption of Ions From The Medium Particles in these types of sols absorb ions from the medium.   Particles in these types of sols absorb H+ and OH+ from the medium.  
They have strong Tyndall effects.   They have weak Tyndall effects.      
Examples Examples of lyophobic sol include: Ferric hydroxide or Aluminum hydroxide dissolved in water, platinum and iron hydroxide.   Examples of lyophilic sol include Starch or protein dissolved in water, gelatin, rubber and gum.