Difference Between Discharge And Arousal Fluid

SHARE

You may notice sometimes your vagina feels really wet out of nowhere so much that you go to the bathroom just to make sure that moisture you feel isn’t period or urine. And if you’re aroused you also may notice a surge in vaginal wetness. What’s going on when this happens and what’s the difference between these fluids?

 Discharge

Vaginal discharge/fluid is made primarily of water, along with some salts like phosphate and sodium chloride, organic compounds such as lipids and amino acids, antibodies that help the body reduce risks of infections and old cells from the lining of the vagina, uterus and cervix.

This fluid leaks from the vagina each day to remove old cells and debris, keeping the vagina and reproductive tract clean and healthy. The amount of vaginal discharge can vary significantly from person to person. The production of vaginal discharge can vary from one person to another and can change in consistency and appearance depending on many factors. Vaginal discharge is generally classified as either abnormal/unusual or normal.

Unusual vaginal discharge may be a sign that you have an infection, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or another health condition that could include: yeast infection, vaginitis, bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, Chlamydia or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unusual/abnormal discharge is often accompanied by other symptoms such as irritation, itchiness or burning in or around your vagina.

Also, vaginal discharge can have causes that aren’t due to any disease. Examples include menstruation, pregnancy, hormones, sexual intercourse or certain hygienic methods such as douches and bidets. Normal vaginal discharge has several purposes: cleaning and moistening the vaginal and helping to prevent and fight infections. Normal vaginal discharge is thin like mucus. It is clear, white or slightly yellow in color. It is usually has no unpleasant odor and is not itchy or irritating to the skin. Normal discharge can be odorless or have a smell, but it’s usually mild and not unpleasant.

Most of the time vaginal discharge is not something you should worry about. You should contact your doctor if you notice your vaginal discharge has changed from its typical consistency, color and smell or if you have other symptoms in your vaginal area.

What You Need To Know About Discharge

  • Discharge is a generalized term, and is made up of cells from the cervix and vagina, bacteria, mucus and water.
  • A discharge can be Grayish, greenish, yellowish or brownish.
  • A discharge is relatively more in volume and is often accompanied by symptoms such as itching or burning. 
  • The discharge fluid becomes way thinner or thicker and is more textured. The fluid consistency can also be sticky or pasty and stretchy.
  • A discharge normally has unpleasant smell (foul or fishy odor).
  • A discharge is either caused by a bacterial or yeast infection.
  • A discharge is usually accompanied by symptoms such as itching, burning sensation and bumps around the genital area.
  • A discharge occurs for a considerable period of time, until the underlying cause is treated.
  • People who are menopausal typically have less discharge as a result of lower level of estrogen.

Arousal Fluid

Arousal fluid is a clearly slimy juice that comes out of a woman’s vagina when she is sexually aroused. The sensation associated with arousal fluid is what many people usually describe as ‘’being wet’’ or identify as ‘’being moist’’. This fluid serves as a natural lubricant to allow easy penetration during sex. Arousal fluid is not the same as cervical mucus.

There are two glands that make things slicker down there when you are turned on. The Bartholin’s glands and Skene’s glands.  Bartholin’s glands are located on either side of your vaginal opening while Skene’s glands are located near the urethra-this gland is believed to be linked to squirting. ‘’Getting wet’’ during sexual activity is a normal physiological reaction to prepare for sex. However, sexual arousal is both a physiological and psychological response.

 Female physical sexual arousal begins with the excitement phase. An increase in genital blood flow leads to swelling of blood vessels (vascular engorgement). This increase in blood flow and pressure causes fluid (transudate) to be pushed onto the surface of the vaginal walls. Once you’re fully physically sexually aroused, it’s normal to feel vaginal sensations, swelling and sufficient wetness. Arousal fluid usually dissipates within an hour of arousal.

What You Need To Know About Arousal Fluid

  • Arousal fluid is produced in response to sexual stimulation by glands in and around the vagina in order to lubricate the vagina for the possibility of intercourse.
  • Arousal fluid is generally clear in color.
  • Arousal fluid is relatively smaller in volume when compared to a discharge.
  • The arousal fluid feels wet, moist and slippery.
  • Unlike cervical mucus or discharge, arousal fluid dissipates quickly (usually within an hour).
  • Arousal fluid is more often accompanied by excitement.
  • The arousal fluid does not have any smell, it literally odorless.
  • Production of arousal fluid begins with excitement phase. An increase in genital blood flow leads to vascular engorgement (swelling of the blood vessels). This increase in blood flow and pressure causes fluid (transudate) to be pushed onto the surface of the vaginal walls.
  • During the menopause, many women may produce less or no arousal fluid to keep the vagina lubricated. This more often results to painful intercourse.

Difference Between Discharge And Arousal Fluid In Tabular Form

BASIS OF COMPARISON DISCHARGE AROUSAL FLUID
Description Discharge is a generalized term, and is made up of cells from the cervix and vagina, bacteria, mucus and water.   Arousal fluid is produced in response to sexual stimulation by glands in and around the vagina in order to lubricate the vagina for the possibility of intercourse.  
Color A discharge can be Grayish, greenish, yellowish or brownish.   Arousal fluid is generally clear in color.  
Volume A discharge is relatively more in volume and is often accompanied by symptoms such as itching or burning.    Arousal fluid is relatively smaller in volume when compared to a discharge.  
Consistency The discharge fluid becomes way thinner or thicker and is more textured. The fluid consistency can also be sticky or pasty and stretchy.   The arousal fluid feels wet, moist and slippery.  
Dissipation A discharge occurs for a considerable period of time, until the underlying cause is treated.   Unlike cervical mucus or discharge, arousal fluid dissipates quickly (usually within an hour).  
Accompaniments A discharge is usually accompanied by symptoms such as itching, burning sensation and bumps around the genital area.   Arousal fluid is more often accompanied by body excitement.  
Smell A discharge normally has unpleasant smell (foul or fishy odor).   The arousal fluid does not have any smell, it literally odorless.  
Menopause People who are menopausal typically have less discharge as a result of lower level of estrogen.   During the menopause, many women may produce less or no arousal fluid to keep the vagina lubricated. This more often results to painful intercourse.  
Cause Of Production A discharge is either caused by a bacterial or yeast infection.   Production of arousal fluid begins with excitement phase. An increase in genital blood flow leads to vascular engorgement (swelling of the blood vessels). This increase in blood flow and pressure causes fluid (transudate) to be pushed onto the surface of the vaginal walls.