8 Difference Between Budding And Grafting (With Chart)

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Grafting and budding are horticultural techniques used to join parts from two or more plants so that they appear to grow as a single plant. Grafting and budding are the most widely used vegetative propagation methods. In grafting, the upper part (scion) of the plant grows on the root system (rootstock) of another plant whereas in budding process, a bud is taken from one plant and grown on another.

In modern horticulture grafting is used for a variety of purposes: to repair injured trees, to produce dwarf trees and shrubs, to strengthen plant’s resistance to certain diseases, to retain varietal characteristics, to adapt varieties to adverse soil or climatic conditions, to ensure pollination, to produce multi-fruited or multi-flowered plants and to propagate certain species such as hybrid roses that cannot propagated in any other way.

Budding

Budding is a grafting technique in which a single bud from the desired scion is used rather than an entire scion containing many buds. Generally, deciduous fruit and shade trees are well suited to budding.

Budding is commonly performed in the growing season, usually in summer or early fall, because mature buds can be procured at that time, and young stocks are then large enough to be worked readily. But budding can be done in early spring, as soon as the bark loosens in this case perfectly dormant buds must have been taken in winter and kept in a cellar, ice-house or other cool place.

What You Need To Know About Budding

  1. Budding is a technique whereby a bud is taken from one plant and grown on another.
  2. In budding, a small bud is used as a scion.
  3. Types of budding include: T-bud, inverted T-bud, Patch bud, chip bud, I-bud, Forkert bud, flute bud, ring/annular bud etc.
  4. Mainly employed in nut trees, ornamental trees and fruits such as peach, apple, plums, cherry and citrus.
  5. Budding is done during the active season of the stock.
  6. Budding is less time consuming when compared to grafting.
  7. In budding, a small bud is used as a scion.
  8. Budding technique requires less expertise in handling than grafting.

Grafting

Grafting is the act of placing a portion of one plant (bud or scion) into or on a stem, root or branch of another (stock) in such a way that a union will be formed and they will continue to grow together.  The upper part of the graft (the scion) becomes the top of the plant; the lower portion (the understock) becomes the root system or part of the trunk.

The best time to perform grafting is in the late winter or early spring before new growth begins. The most appropriate time is after the period of severe cold has passed. The scion may be collected during winter and then stored in a moist cold place. At home, the scion can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.

What You Need To Know About Grafting

  1. Grafting is a method of inserting a part of one plant into another plant in such a way that the two will unite and continue their growth.
  2. In grafting, part of a stem or a branch is used as the scion.
  3. Types of grafting include: cleft graft, bark graft, whip graft, side-veneer graft, splice graft, saddle graft, bridge graft, inarch graft etc.
  4. Commonly employed in flowers and fruits such as pears and avocado.
  5. Grafting is done when the stock is dormant in the winter and early spring.
  6. Grafting is more time consuming when compared to budding.
  7. In grafting, part of a stem or a branch is used as the scion.
  8. Grafting requires some expertise in handling.

Also Read: Difference Between Grafting And Layering

Difference Between Budding And Grafting In Tabular Form

BASIS OF COMPARISON BUDDING GRAFTING
Description Budding is a technique whereby a bud is taken from one plant and grown on another.   Grafting is a method of inserting a part of one plant into another plant in such a way that the two will unite and continue their growth.  
Scion In budding, a small bud is used as a scion.   In grafting, part of a stem or a branch is used as the scion.  
Types T-bud, inverted T-bud, Patch bud, chip bud, I-bud, Forkert bud, flute bud, ring/annular bud etc. Cleft graft, bark graft, whip graft, side-veneer graft, splice graft, saddle graft, bridge graft, inarch graft etc.  
Application Mainly employed in nut trees, ornamental trees and fruits such as peach, apple, plums, cherry and citrus.   Commonly employed in flowers and fruits such as pears and avocado.  
Appropriate Time To Perform Budding is done during the active season of the stock.   Grafting is done when the stock is dormant in the winter and early spring.  
Time Aspect Budding is less time consuming when compared to grafting.   Grafting is more time consuming when compared to budding.  
Scion In budding, a small bud is used as a scion.   In grafting, part of a stem or a branch is used as the scion.  
Expertise Skills Budding technique requires less expertise in handling than grafting.   Grafting requires some expertise in handling.