7 Difference Between Cell Splitting And Cell Sectoring

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Cell Splitting

Cell splitting is the process of subdividing a congested cell into smaller cells, such that each smaller cell has its own base station and a correspondingly reduced antenna height and reduced transmitter power.

What You Need To Know About Cell Splitting

  1. A congested cell  is subdivided into smaller cells.
  2. Cell splitting increase the capacity of the cellular system since it increases the number of times that channels are reused.
  3. By defining new cells which have a smaller radius than the original cells and by installing these smaller cells (microcells) between the existing cells, capacity increases due to additional channels/unit area.
  4. The cell is divided into a smaller cell.
  5. In order to maintain the S/I ratio in cell splitting, the transmittance power must be reduced.
  6. In order to improve the capacity, the radius of the cell is decreased and the co-channel reuse ratio D/R is kept constant.
  7. Cell splitting decreases the number of handoffs and call progress can be smoothly done because large macro-cell are dedicated to high-speed traffic.

Also Read: Difference Between IEEE 802.3af And IEEE 802.3at

Cell Sectoring

In cell sectoring, a single omni-directional antenna at base station is replaced by several directional antennas, each radiating within a specified sector.  Cell sectoring is done mainly to reduce factors such as co-channel interference.

What You Need To Know About Cell Sectoring

  1. It basically involves replacing an omni-directional antenna at the base station by several directional antennas.
  2. By using directional antennas power is transmitted in single desired direction decreasing number of interfering co-channel cells and co-channel interference.
  3. Cell sectoring is the technique for decreasing co-channel interference and thus increasing system performance by using directional antennas.
  4. The cell is divided into 120o and 60o sectors.
  5. By use of directional antenna, cell sectoring improves the S/I ratio.
  6. In order to improve capacity, the radius of the cell is kept constant and the co-channel reuse ratio D/R is decreased.
  7. Cell sectoring increases the number of handoffs and decreases the coverage area of a group of channels.

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