10 Difference Between G-Tube And J-Tube (With Pictures)

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feeding tube is a medical device used to provide nutrition to people who cannot obtain nutrition by mouth, are unable to swallow safely, or need nutritional supplementation. The state of being fed by a feeding tube is called gavageenteral feeding or tube feeding. Placement may be temporary for the treatment of acute conditions or lifelong in the case of chronic disabilities.

There are dozens of conditions that may require tube feeding. The more common conditions that necessitate feeding tubes include prematurity, failure to thrive (or malnutrition), neurologic and neuromuscular disorders, inability to swallow, anatomical and post-surgical malformations of the mouth and esophagus, cancer, Sanfilippo syndrome, and digestive disorders.

A variety of feeding tubes are used in medical practice. They are usually made of polyurethane or silicone. The diameter of a feeding tube is measured in French units (each French unit equals ⅓ mm). They are classified by the site of insertion and intended use.

The most common types of tubes include those placed through the nose, including nasogastric, nasoduodenal, and nasojejunal tubes, and those placed directly into the abdomen, such as a gastrostomy, gastrojejunostomy, or jejunostomy feeding tube.

What Is Gastronomy Feeding Tube (G Tube)?

gastric feeding tube (G-tube or “button”) is a tube inserted through a small incision in the abdomen into the stomach and is used for long-term enteral nutrition. G-tubes are used for a variety of medical conditions, but the most common use is for feedings to enhance your child’s nutrition. When a child is unable to eat enough food by mouth, a G-tube helps deliver enough calories and nutrients to support their growth.

The most commonly used G-tube types are:

  • Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes (PEG tubes) and Long tubes: one-piece tubes held in position by a bumper or by a retention balloon.
  • Buttons or Low profile tubes: tubes without a permanently attached long tube. They have an extension set, connected when needed and disconnected after use. When the extension set is disconnected, the button lies relatively flat against the skin.

What You Need To Know About G Tube

  • The G-tube is inserted in the stomach by making a small cut in the abdomen.
  • The main use of the G-tube is to provide the body with the required medications and food as well as to release the stomach gases.
  • The G tube makes the supply of nutrients faster because of the large area of the stomach.
  • The G-tube is suitable for patients who have difficulty in swallowing because of stroke, esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula.
  • The G-tube can be placed through an endoscope, laparoscope or by an open abdomen surgery.
  • The G-tubes are easy to change and can be changed at home.
  • Feeding is faster because the stomach has an expandable area and fundus (upper curved part of the stomach).
  • After insertion of G-tube, a complication of the presence of a G-tube can be the formation of granulation tissue, which can be irritating, painful and bleed easily.

What Is Jejunostomy Tube (J Tube)?

A jejunostomy tube (J-tube) is a soft, plastic tube placed through the skin of the abdomen, through the pylorus into the midsection of the small intestine (jejunum). The tube delivers food and medicine until the person is healthy enough to eat by mouth. This type of feeding is also known as post-pyloric or trans-pyloric feeding. The tube may be placed directly into the small bowel surgically or threaded into the small bowel through a gastrostomy as part of an X-ray procedure. Jejunostomy tubes are used for feedings when both the mouth and stomach must be bypassed because of recurrent vomiting or other causes.

The methods of placing a J-tube are:

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ): a direct placement with the use of an endoscope.
  2. Laparoscopic or open surgery: the tube is placed through an incision directly into the small intestine.
  3. Gastric bypass procedure or Roux-en-Y: a small “limb” is created of a portion of the jejunum and is attached to the abdominal wall. The J-tube is placed in the created limb. The method is complicated and affects the anatomy of the jejunum. It allows for a stable tract and easy tube changes, which can be made at home.

What You Need To Know About J Tube

  • J tube is inserted in the middle part of the small intestine.
  • The main use of the J-tube is to supply the body with essential nutrients and medications.
  • The J tube takes a lot of time to supply nutrients. It can take up to 24 hours for the nutrients to reach the body.
  • The J-tube is suitable for patients who are suffering from chronic vomiting, low stomach motility or high risk for aspiration.
  • The J-tube is placed either endoscopically, laparoscopically , through the gastric bypass procedure or Roux-en-Y.  
  • J-tubes are somehow technical to insert and therefore cannot be changed at home.
  • It requires slow continuous feeding with a pump.
  • After insertion, of the J tube, problems such as irritation and granulation tissue may be expected.

Difference Between G-Tube And J-Tube In Tabular Form

BASIS OF COMPARISON G-TUBE J-TUBE
Insertion The G-tube is inserted in the stomach by making a small cut in the abdomen.   J tube is inserted in the middle part of the small intestine.  
Main Use The main use of the G-tube is to provide the body with the required medications and food as well as to release the stomach gases.   The main use of the J-tube is to supply the body with essential nutrients and medications.  
Supply Of Nutrients The G tube makes the supply of nutrients faster because of the large area of the stomach.   The J tube takes a lot of time to supply nutrients. It can take up to 24 hours for the nutrients to reach the body.  
Suitability The G-tube is suitable for patients who have difficulty in swallowing because of stroke, esophageal atresia or tracheoesophageal fistula.   The J-tube is suitable for patients who are suffering from chronic vomiting, low stomach motility or high risk for aspiration.  
Method Of Insertion The G-tube can be placed through an endoscope, laparoscope or by an open abdomen surgery.   The J-tube is placed either endoscopically, laparoscopically , through the gastric bypass procedure or Roux-en-Y.    
Change At Home The G-tubes are easy to change and can be changed at home.   J-tubes are somehow technical to insert and therefore cannot be changed at home.  
Feeding Operation Feeding is faster because the stomach has an expandable area and fundus (upper curved part of the stomach).   It requires slow continuous feeding with a pump.  
Side-Effects After insertion of G-tube, a complication of the presence of a G-tube can be the formation of granulation tissue, which can be irritating, painful and bleed easily.   After insertion, of the J tube, problems such as irritation and granulation tissue may be expected.  

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