7 Difference Between Template And Coding Strand

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DNA is a two-stranded molecule. One strand of DNA holds the information that codes for various genes, this often referred to as the template strand or antisense strand (containing anticodons). The other complementary strand is referred to as the coding strand or sense strand (containing codons).

What Is Template Strand?

Transcription is the process in which a gene’s DNA sequence is copied (transcribed) to make an RNA molecule. In this process, RNA polymerase is the main transcription enzyme. Transcription begins when RNA polymerase binds to a promoter sequence near the beginning of a gene (directly or through helper proteins). RNA polymerase uses one of the DNA strands (the template strand) as a template to make a new, complementary RNA molecule.

DNA Template strand therefore, is the term that refers to the strand used by DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase to attach complementary bases during DNA replication or RNA transcription, respectively, either molecule moves down the strand in the 3’ to 5’ direction and at each subsequent base, it adds the complementary of the current DNA base to the growing nucleic acid strand (which is thus created in the 5’ to 3’ direction).

What You Need To Know About Template

  1. Template strand is also referred to as antisense strand, non-coding strand or negative strand.
  2. Hydrogen bonds are formed between the template strand and the synthesizing mRNA, temporary during transcription.
  3. Template strand contains the same nucleotide sequence as the tRNA.
  4. Template strand is made up of anti-codons
  5. Template strand is transcribed into mRNA
  6. Template strand is directed in the 5’ to 3’ direction
  7. Template strand is made up of complementary nucleotide sequence as the mRNA.

What Is Coding Strand?

The coding strand of a DNA double helix is the strand not used as a template by DNA or RNA polymerase during DNA replication or RNA transcription. However, because the replicated/transcribed nucleic acid is produced from the template strand of DNA based on complementarity, it winds up being identical to the coding strand (except for the replacement of thymine with uracil in the case of RNA).

What You Need To Know About Coding Strand

  1. Coding strand is also referred to as positive strand, nontemplate strand or sense strand.
  2. There are no hydrogen bonds that are formed between the coding strand and the synthesizing mRNA during transcription.
  3. Coding strand contains the complementary nucleotide sequence as the tRNA.
  4. Coding strand is made up of codons
  5. Coding strand is not transcribed into mRNA
  6. Coding strand is directed in the 3’ to 5’ direction
  7. Coding strand contains the same nucleotide sequence to mRNA, except thymine.

Also Read: Difference Between Nucleotide And Nucleoside

Difference Between Template And Coding Strand In Tabular Form

BASIS OF COMPARISON TEMPLATE STRAND CODING STRAND
Alternative Name Template strand is also referred to as antisense strand, non-coding strand or negative strand.   Coding strand is also referred to as positive strand, non-template strand or sense strand.  
Hydrogen Bonds Hydrogen bonds are formed between the template strand and the synthesizing mRNA, temporary during transcription.   There are no hydrogen bonds that are formed between the coding strand and the synthesizing mRNA during transcription.  
Content Template strand contains the same nucleotide sequence as the tRNA.   Coding strand contains the complementary nucleotide sequence as the tRNA.  
Codons Template strand is made up of anti-codons   Coding strand is made up of codons  
Transcription Template strand is transcribed into mRNA   Coding strand is not transcribed into mRNA  
Direction Template strand is directed in the 5’ to 3’ direction   Coding strand is directed in the 3’ to 5’ direction  
Makeup Template strand is made up of complementary nucleotide sequence as the mRNA.   Coding strand contains the same nucleotide sequence to mRNA, except thymine.  

Also Read: Difference Between Introns And Exons

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